MADE IN ITALY.

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EMILIO ISGRO’: POET OF IMAGES
One of the great innovators of the artistic language in post-war Italy, Isgrò offers a different perspective on the country’s artistic panorama to what has been shown in the UK before. Tornabuoni is taking this opportunity to broaden its focus beyond the Italian avant-garde groups of the 1950s-1970s and consider the role of one of the main proponents of Poesia Visiva (Visual Poetry) and precursor of international conceptual art since the early 1960s.
I don’t consider myself a painter, but rather a poet who writes with images.— Emilio Isgrò, 1985

Cancellation is never a correction: the correct word never overlaps with the wrong one, and no red sign stands out to indicate an imprecision; Isgrò does not correct, does not remove, does not add: it simply covers (black on white, but also white on black)
1 DANTE AND BEATRICE

2 FRATELLI DI SICILIA

3 IO SONO IO

 

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BRUNO MUNARI: CHILHOOD, CHILD MOOD
Italian artist and designer Bruno Munari is one of the world’s most celebrated innovators. But despite being influenced by and working through different artistic movements from Futurism to Surrealism to Concrete Art, Munari cannot be associated with any one specific genre.
A child-like fascination with the world around him fuelled Munari's unceasing activity over more than 70 productive years. "You must always have something to look forward to, because, if you have something in the pipeline, you stay young," he told Telema magazine in 1995. "If your life revolves around memories, you just get old."
1.FORCHETTE, 1958

2.ROSES IN THE SALAD, 1974

3.UNLESS MACHINES

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EMILIANO PONZI: IRONIC SADNESS 
Emiliano Ponzi is an award-winning Italian illustrator known for his distinctive strong graphic compositions. Famous for his bold, textured designs, he creates contemporary scenes that become backdrops for his satirical reflections on the world around us. The artist has the ability to evoke strong emotions with his classy and brave work with pen and brush.
1. THE NEW GURU

2. SOCIAL NETWORK

3. THE DOUBT

Hello world! Who I would like to be.

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4
5 67
  8 9 10

1,2. MANJIT THAPP is an illustrator based in the UK, killing
it on instagram and merging the use of digital creative
programming with the pencil.
“I want to explore this avenue of mixing fashion and
illustration more in the future!”
Modern and young, this is what I wish I’ll be.
3. EGON SCHIELE. Born in 1890, Schiele was part of an
Austrian generation for whom the subjective was all. The
outside world was false, absurd, mad. They only trusted their
own fantasies and fears.
I learned a lot from this artist, his way to represent the
female word and the relationship between man and sexuality.
Provocative, modern, intime. He’s the Artist with the A in
block capital!
4.TOULOSE LAUTREC. Toulouse-Lautrec was the first artist to
elevate advertising to the status of a fine art. This is an
extraordinary shift in the history of art, obliterating the
boundaries between high (painting, drawing, sculpture) and
low (posters, logos and other forms of visual culture) art.
Acknowledging that some of his greatest masterpieces were
posters for nightclubs does not in any way diminish their
value.Lautrec’s attitude to women was complex. Son of a
doting mother and distant father, the little fellow had
precious little luck with ladies, taking comfort in the arms
of prostitutes instead.
5. GUSTAV KLIMT. Klimt drew inspiration for the paintings
from ancient Greek, Byzantine, early medieval, and Japanese
art as well as from such contemporary artists as Jan Toorop,
Fernand Khnopff, George Minne, Ferdinand Hodler, and Edvard
Munch. He synthesized these varied sources into an entirely
new stylistic vocabulary, arranging the figures of the frieze
either frontally or in profile, and subjugating their bodies
to strong horizontals and/or verticals. The creative process
of this highly ambitious project can be seen in numerous
preparatory drawings.
  6.FRIDA KHALO. “They thought I was a Surrealist, but I
     wasn’t. I never painted dreams. I painted my own
                        reality.”
Kahlo produced only about 200 paintings—primarily still lifes
and portraits of herself, family and friends. She also kept
an illustrated journal and did dozens of drawings.
Pain and Passion, this is Frida Khalo.
7. Soul of a child, illustration by  Fumi Koike,  1985 born
in Japan .
this picture is simple, colorful, and it has a perfect
balance.
I love the style of this blogger/illustrator.
8. PIERO MANZONI. In 1960 he marked with his thumbprint some
hard-cooked eggs and offered them to the visitors, who were
thus invited to “devour” art.
What I like of this art work, it’s that you can find art in
little things as an egg.
9. WASSILY KANDINSKY. Abstract art emerged from the artists’ desire to create works unrelated and unrestrained by visual references in reality.
 In 1920 painter Wassily Kandinsky decided to free his artworks from the bondage of subject matter. Subsequently, Untitled (First Abstract Watercolor) painting was made and abstract art as a genre was born. The piece that’s considered to be the first abstract painting ever made is marked with vibrant colors and smears that span over the edges of figurative art. Colors were particularly important in Wassily Kandinsky’s paintings and he thought of them as an expression of emotion rather than tools for the faithful description of reality.
10. REBECCA DAUTREMERE. It’s hard not to fall in love with
the work of French illustrator Rebecca Dautremer; Her picture
books are like stepping into magical worlds filled
with charming characters. With warm color palettes, subtle
textures, and unexpected compositions, she tells her fairy-
tale & folklore inspired stories with a surprising twist &
a touch of humor, making them extraordinary stories for
children and adults alike.